Human Functioning and Rehabilitation Science

http://www.uvm.edu/cnhs/

Overview

Human Functioning and Rehabilitation Science is translational in nature focusing on understanding the spectrum of human functioning from the basic physiological function of cells and body systems to overall physical capability and unified by the common theme of human motor performance. The program is designed to consider health at three levels: 1) status of body structures and functions (molecular, cellular, and organ systems levels); 2) ability of the individual to participate in human activities and assume societal roles; and, 3) physical and social aspects of the environment that support the health of individuals and populations. Study of abnormal functioning and the related activity impairments and participation restrictions can lead directly to improvements in the physical, psychological, and social health of people with disabling health conditions. In addition, changes in physiological function at the molecular, cell, organ and systems level; motor control; language production and understanding; social cognition; and participation in physical activity often coincide in persons with disabling health conditions. This interprofessional doctoral program will facilitate the generation of new knowledge by providing an academic training platform for research collaboration across the professional health disciplines represented by the College of Nursing and Health Sciences (CNHS).

Degrees

Abrams, Sarah; Associate Professor, Department of Nursing; Ph.D., University of California-San Francisco
Amiel, Eyal; Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences; Ph.D., Dartmouth Medical School
Bosek, Marcia; Associate Professor, Department of Nursing; DNSc., Rush University
Brock, David; Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences; PhD., University of Virginia
Cannizzaro, Michael; Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders; PhD., University of Connecticut
Deming, Paula; Associate Professor, Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Escorpizo, Reuben; Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science; DPT, Des Moines University
Freitze, Seth; Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences; Ph.D., Harvard University
Gell, Nancy; Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science; Ph.D. Auburn University
Guitar, Barry; Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders; PhD. University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hutchins, Tiffany; Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders; PhD., University of South Florida
Kasser, Susan; Professsor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science; Ph.D., Oregon State University 
Krementsov, Dimitry; Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences; Ph.D., University of Vermont
Laurent, Jennifer; Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing; Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Lewis, Laura; Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing; Ph.D., University of Connecticut
Maltby, Hendrika; Professor, Department of Nursing; Ph.D., Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia
Palumbo, Mary Val; Associate Professor, Department of Nursing; DNP, Rush University
Prelock, Patricia; Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders; PhD., University of Pittsburgh
Sibold, Jeremy; Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation & Movement Science; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Tompkins, Connie; Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation & Movement Science; PhD., University of New Orleans
Tourville, Timothy; Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation & Movement Science; PhD., University of Vermont
Velleman, Shelley; Professor, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders; PhD., University of Texas-Austin
Wu, Ge, Professor; Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science; Ph.D., Boston University

Courses

HFRS 396. Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

HFRS 401. Topics & Measurement in HFRS. 3 Credits.

Fundamental human function and rehabilitation sciences concepts, principles, equipment, and tools for conducting quantitative research in the areas of human movement, communication, and physical activity.

HFRS 402. Applying the ICF Model to HFRS. 3 Credits.

Application of International Classification of Functioning (ICF) concepts to translational research in human function and rehabilitation science.

HFRS 430. Sem/Pract Teach & Learn HFRS. 3 Credits.

Students will be exposed to and mentored in the fundamentals of health professions teaching and learning and gain applied experience in the university classroom.

HFRS 450. Prof Writing & Grantsmanship. 2 Credits.

Topics include grant selection and approval processes, selection of appropriate publication outlets for a given research study, and report of research results. Prerequisites: HFRS 401, HFRS 402, CTS 301, CTS 310, CTS 315.

HFRS 491. Doctoral Dissertation Research. 3-6 Credits.

Directed interprofessional dissertation research in Human Functioning and Rehabilitation Science. Prerequisite: Doctoral candidacy status.