Biochemistry in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

http://biochem.uvm.edu/undergraduate-program/

The interdisciplinary Biochemistry program is administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) in conjunction with the College of Medicine (COM). The Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry can be pursued through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) or through the College of Arts and Sciences.

CALS Biochemistry Major

Biochemistry is the basic science that explores the chemical and physical properties of living organisms and the chemical changes that occur in these organisms. It is integral to the study of multiple disciplines within the life and biomedical sciences, including biology, chemistry, microbiology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, nutrition and food sciences, animal sciences, plant biology, and plant sciences. The Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry draws upon a broad set of university resources from CALS, CAS, and COM to provide students with a modern science-based education designed to emphasize fundamental knowledge of chemistry and biology along with advanced courses specializing in biochemistry and related life and biomedical sciences. The biochemistry curriculum offers students with a strong academic ability in the sciences an opportunity to explore upper-level courses in areas of modern biochemistry and is designed to meet the needs of students wishing to compete in the job market at the B.S. degree level as well as students planning to continue with advanced studies in a graduate or professional degree program.

Students may apply to the program either through CALS or CAS, which vary in their college distribution requirements. The distribution categories and the number of required courses in each category differ slightly. In CAS, students are required to fulfill distribution requirements in all of the following seven categories: foreign languages, fine arts, literature, humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, and mathematics, plus complete the University Approved Diversity requirements. In CALS, students are required to fulfill distribution requirements in science, humanities and fine arts, communication skills, information technology skills, quantitative skills, critical thinking skills, interpersonal skills, citizenship and social responsibility values, environmental stewardship values, and personal growth values. Regardless of the college through which students choose to apply, all students must take a core set of basic courses in chemistry, biology, and mathematics in their first two years followed by advanced courses in biochemistry, chemistry, and/or molecular biology in their third and fourth years. Since biochemistry is a “hands-on” science, involvement of students in undergraduate research projects, most of which qualify as Honors projects in either college, is strongly encouraged.

Biochemistry Major

Biochemistry B.S.

Biochemistry Minor

Biochemistry

Biochemistry M.S.

Biochemistry Ph.D.

See the online Graduate Catalogue for more information

Courses

BIOC 090. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 095. Introductory Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

BIOC 096. Introductory Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

BIOC 185. Biochem for Life & Health Sci. 3 Credits.

Exploring biological processes at the molecular level and how they are controlled. Topics include enzymes, gene expression, and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Prerequisite: CHEM 042 or acceptable coursework in organic chemistry. Cross-listed with: ASCI 185, NFS 183, PBIO 185.

BIOC 187. BiochemLab for Life&Health Sci. 1 Credit.

Introduction to techniques used to explore fundamental biochemistry concepts including enzyme kinetics, lipids, carbohydrate chemistry, and gene expression. Includes spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Pre/Co-requisites:PBIO 185, BIOC 185, ASCI 185, or NFS 183. Cross-listed with: ASCI 187, NFS 187, PBIO 187.

BIOC 190. Internship. 1-18 Credits.

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 191. Undergraduate Research. 1-18 Credits.

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Written report due at end of each semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Credit as arranged, up to four hours per semester.

BIOC 192. Undergraduate Research. 1-18 Credits.

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Written report due at end of each semester. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

BIOC 193. Independent Study. 1-18 Credits.

A course which is tailored to fit the interests of a specific student, which occurs outside the traditional ?classroom/laboratory setting? under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 194. Teaching Assistantship. 1-3 Credits.

Undergraduate student service as a teaching assistant, usually in an introductory level course in the discipline, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 195. Intermediate Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

BIOC 196. Intermediate Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

BIOC 205. Biochemistry I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to chemistry and structure of biological macromolecules; examination of mechanisms of chemical processes in biological systems including enzyme catalysis, biosynthesis, regulation, and information transfer. Prerequisite: CHEM 142 or CHEM 144. Cross-listed with: CHEM 205 and MMG 205.

BIOC 206. Biochemistry II. 3 Credits.

Continuation of Biochemistry I. Biochemistry of nucleic acids; nucleic acid based processes, such as replication and transcription; cellular information transfer, genomics, and proteomics. Prerequisite: BIOC 205, CHEM 205, or MMG 205. Cross-listed with: CHEM 206, MMG 206.

BIOC 207. Biochemistry Lab. 2 Credits.

Introduction to biochemical tools, including spectrometry, chromatography, and electrophoresis; natural and recombinant enzyme isolation; assays of DNA-modifying enzymes; computer-based structure/function exercises. Prerequisite: BIOC 205, CHEM 205, or MMG 205. Cross-listed with: CHEM 207, MMG 207.

BIOC 212. Biochemistry of Human Disease. 3 Credits.

Molecular approach to genetic, metabolic, and infectious diseases; recombinant DNA technology and medicine; molecular biology of cancer. Prerequisite: CHEM 042, CHEM 044, or CHEM 141.

BIOC 240. Macromol Struct Prot&Nucl Acid. 3 Credits.

Introduction to structural biology and macromolecular structure with an emphasis on protein-protein and protein-nucleic acids interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL 002 or BCOR 012, and CHEM 142; Junior standing. Cross-listed with: MMG 240. Alternate years.

BIOC 263. Nutritional Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Nutritional Biochemistry is a comprehensive study of the metabolism of the macro-nutrients by humans with emphasis on hormonal control of biochemical pathways, nutritional and metabolic interrelationships and dietary disorders. The biochemistry of the micronutrients and vitamins will also be studied. Prerequisite: BIOC 205 or PBIO 185.

BIOC 284. Biochemistry Senior Seminar. 1 Credit.

Oral and written presentation of a subject of current biochemical interest. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Cross-listed with: CHEM 284, MMG 284.

BIOC 290. Internship. 1-18 Credits.

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 292. Undergraduate Research. 1-18 Credits.

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 293. Independent Study. 1-18 Credits.

A course which is tailored to fit the interests of a specific student, which occurs outside the traditional ?classroom/laboratory setting? under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 294. Teaching Assistantship. 1-3 Credits.

Undergraduate student service as a teaching assistant, usually in an introductory level course in the discipline, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

BIOC 295. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

BIOC 296. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.