Greek and Latin

http://www.uvm.edu/~classics/

Overview

Graduate students in the program primarily learn general philological skills in Greek and Latin. That said, current faculty research interests include Mycenaean and Homeric Greece; Greek and Latin lyric and elegiac poetry; Greek drama; the Attic orators; ancient literary criticism; Greek and Roman philosophy and intellectual history; Greek and Roman historiography; Greek and Latin prose; Latin epic; satire; Greek and Roman technological authors; Roman history; Roman imperial families; mythology; archaeology; medieval studies; Near Eastern history; and ancient music. There is also particular faculty interest in the following authors: Cicero; Homer; Virgil; Petronius; Ovid; Plato.

Degrees

Bailly, Jacques A.; Associate Professor, Department of Classics; PHD, Cornell University
Chiu, Angeline C.; Associate Professor, Department of Classics; PHD, Princeton University
Franklin, John C; Associate Professor, Department of Classics; PHD, University College London
Rodgers, Robert Howard; Professor, Department of Classics; PHD, Harvard University
Usher, Mark David; Associate Professor, Department of Classics; PHD, University of Chicago

Greek & Latin Courses

GKLT 300. Proseminar. 3 Credits.

Introduction to philology. Students will normally take this their first semester.

GKLT 381. Seminar. 0 or 3 Credits.

Intensive study at the graduate level of Greek and Latin authors not read in the candidate's undergraduate program.

GKLT 391. Master's Thesis Research. 1-6 Credits.

Greek Courses

GRK 201. Greek Orators. 3 Credits.

Selected speeches of Lysias and Demosthenes. B. Saylor Rodgers. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 202. Greek Comedy. 3 Credits.

Two plays of Aristophanes. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 203. Greek Historians. 3 Credits.

Thucydides, Books I and II; selections from Herodotus and Xenophon's Hellenica. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 204. Greek Tragedy. 3 Credits.

Sophocles' Antigone, and Euripides' Medea, or two equivalent plays. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 205. Greek Philosophers. 3 Credits.

Dialogues of Plato with attention to language and dialectical method; Aristotle, Xenophon or Presocratic philosophers may be read. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 206. Greek Epic. 3 Credits.

Reading in the Iliad and Odyssey. Problems of epic composition and language together with mythological and historical background. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 211. Greek Prose Style. 3 Credits.

Readings in literary prose analyzed stylistically and imitated in composition. Required of Greek majors.

GRK 212. Greek Prose Style. 3 Credits.

Readings in literary prose analyzed stylistically and imitated in composition. Required of Greek majors.

GRK 227. Greek Lyric Poetry. 3 Credits.

A study of early Greek personal, elegiac, and choral poetry from Archilochus to Pindar, including Sappho and Alcaeus, Simonides and Bacchylides. Prerequisites: Two years of college Greek or equivalent. Alternate years, as needed.

GRK 295. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

Advanced courses or seminars on topics beyond the scope of existing departmental offerings. See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

GRK 296. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

Advanced courses or seminars on topics beyond the scope of existing departmental offerings. See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Latin Courses

LAT 203. Republican Prose. 3 Credits.

Extensive reading in Caesar and Sallust, and in the speeches of Cicero. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 204. Epic Poets. 3 Credits.

Extensive reading in Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and others. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 211. Latin Prose Style. 3 Credits.

Readings in literary prose analyzed stylistically and imitated in composition. Required of Latin majors.

LAT 212. Latin Prose Style. 3 Credits.

Readings in literary prose analyzed stylistically and imitated in composition. Required of Latin majors.

LAT 227. Roman Lyric Poets. 3 Credits.

Selections from the works of Catullus, Horace, Propertius, and Tibullus. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 251. Roman Letters. 3 Credits.

Letters of Cicero, Horace, and Pliny. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 252. Comedy. 3 Credits.

Two plays of Plautus and Terence. Study of the precursors of this literary form. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 253. Roman Oratory. 3 Credits.

Selections from Cicero's De Oratore, Orator, Brutus, and from his speeches. Historical development of forensic and other rhetorical canons. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 255. Historians of the Empire. 3 Credits.

Historians of the Empire. Augustus, Res Gestae; Tacitus, Annals, I-IV; selections from Suetonius and Ammianus Marcellinus. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 256. Satire. 3 Credits.

Selections from Horace, Persius, Juvenal, Petronius. Study of the development of this literary form. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 271. Silver Latin. 3 Credits.

Extensive reading of post-Augustan authors not included in other advanced courses. Alternate years, as needed.

LAT 295. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

Advanced courses or seminars on topics beyond the scope of existing departmental offerings. See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

LAT 296. Advanced Special Topics. 1-18 Credits.

Advanced courses or seminars on topics beyond the scope of existing departmental offerings. See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.